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Embarcadero has acquired Castalia and Usertility

There have been rumors, and some of them are true….

I’m excited to announce today that Embarcadero Technologies has acquired Castalia and Usertility. The official press release is here: http://www.embarcadero.com/press-releases/embarcadero-acquires-castalia-and-usertility-from-twodesk-software

I know this brings up some questions. I’ll try to answer the most common of them:

What does this mean for current Castalia customers?

Customers with a current maintenance subscription for Castalia will continue to receive updates & fixes for the life of their subscription. In fact, there is an update coming VERY soon that addresses the large memory consumption issues that some of you have have been seeing – I’ll let you know when it’s available.

Is Castalia still available for purchase?

Castalia is available as part of the Bonus Pack for RAD Studio and Delphi XE7 purchased through Embarcadero. It is not available for purchase from TwoDesk.

What does this mean for Usertility customers?

First (and most important), the Usertility service continues to function.

Since Usertility is now an Embarcadero product, Usertility customers are now customers of Embarcadero instead of TwoDesk. At some point in the near future, we will be moving Usertility from TwoDesks’s servers to Embarcadero’s. We’re working on a plan to do that with minimal downtime, and we’ll let customers know when that’s going to happen.

Will Usertility be available for new signups?

Yes. Stay tuned to Embarcadero for more details on that.

What’s Jacob doing now?

I’m working with Embarcadero. I intend to stay closely involved in the future direction and delivery of this integration and look forward to bringing these next versions to market with Embarcadero.

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Usertility hits 10,000,000 data points!

Sometime today, Usertility recorded recorded its 10 millionth data point. That’s a lot of data!

Want to know how people really use your software? Usertility helps Delphi programmers learn how there software is used. Find out more at twodesk.com/usertility.

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Usertility has recorded 1,000,000 data points!

Just a quick note: This morning at 11:25:06 UTC, Usertility recorded its MILLIONTH data point.

Want to know how people really use your software? Usertility helps Delphi programmers learn how their software is used. Find out more at twodesk.com/usertility.

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New features in Usertility: Sortable tables and raw event counts

Last week, I pushed out a few updates to the Usertility web interface to help you better learn how people use your software. If you haven’t looked at Usertility in the last few days, you should check out the changes:

Sortable tables

Sorted OS VersionsBefore this update, data tables in Usertility were always sorted by the metric being measured. For example, if you were looking at the number of users using a particular operating system, it would be sorted from most popular to least popular.

Now, you can sort the tables however you like. So you could sort by user count, session count, OS version, etc….

Sorting is simple, just click the arrows in the header of the table. To sort by multiple columns, hold down the Shift key while clicking additional columns.

Raw event counts

In the Advanced Analysis tab of Usertility, I’ve added a new metric: Event count.

Prior to this update, you could view the number of Users or Sessions that triggered a particular event, but not the actual number of times the event had taken place. This update adds that ability, so you can now see the actual number of times that the event occured.

Advanced Analysis Event Count

Come check out the new features and learn how people really use your software at twodesk.com/usertility.

 

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Usertility updates: Advanced data analysis, CSV export, and guest users

Usertility provides application usage analytics for software written in Delphi. Use Usertility to learn how people really use your software.


Over the weekend, I pushed out an update to the Usertility web interface that adds some cool new features. If you haven’t looked at Usertility in the last few days, you should check it out:

Advanced Analysis tab

Usertility Advanced Analysis

The Advanced Analysis tab lets you build custom reports out of just about any data that Usertility has (including some that you can’t find anywhere else). You choose your dimensions and a metric, and Usertility will combine all possible permutations of the chosen dimensions and show the metric for each one. You can use advanced analysis to answer questions like these:

  • Does my app more have more errors on Windows 8 than Windows 7?
  • Are certain features used more in older versions of my software than new?
  • Does my software have errors that only appear on AMD CPUs, but not Intel?

CSV Export

Along with Advanced Analysis, you can now export report data to CSV, so you can get Usertility’s application usage data into Excel or any other analysis tool you choose.

CSV download is available for both the Advanced Analysis and Custom Events views.

Guest Users

You can now give read-only access to your Usertility analytics to others, such as partners, employees, or consultants. Your guest users see the same data that you see, but they can’t make any modifications to your app properties. You can add and delete guests as often as you need.

The “Standard” plan allows one guest user. The “Plus” plan allows up to five.

To add guest users to an app, click “Edit” from the app list, or click the “properties” tab when viewing any app data.


Come check out these features and learn how people really use your software at twodesk.com/usertility.

 

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For programmers, by a programmer

Hi. My name is Jacob, and I'm the creator of Castalia.

I starting programming in 1986, learning Lightspeed Pascal on a Mac Classic. Today, I'm a professional programmer, teacher, and entrepreneur.

I have a Master's Degree in Computer Science, and I still love Pascal and Delphi.

I believe that writing code is the heart and soul of software development, and I love helping programmers write code more effectively.